What I offer

People come to counselling for different reasons and have differing ideas of what counselling is.  It is important for the counsellor to be the right fit because there are many approaches or styles and not all will give you what you need. The whole idea of counselling can be daunting, so I admire anyone making the choice to help themselves explore what is concerning or distressing them. To be open and vulnerable is brave.  For this reason some people can stall a few times before they know they are ready.  In my experience, counselling is more likely to be effective where there is a level of readiness and commitment, which can just be turning up to the sessions when things feel difficult and challenging, and to be with whatever is happening.

My commitment is to your wellbeing and my approach is to lightly and safely help you to explore anything that you want to bring, without conditions or judgement or having to do anything or say anything which isn’t your choice.  I try to create an environment where you can be seen and heard and met where you are.

I have an integrative counselling background and this usually refers to having studied different methods or styles of counselling and psychotherapy in order to have a broad toolkit of techniques.  An integrative counsellor then determines what best suits a particular client.  Using this as a foundation, I have established my own style and approach, which holds the relationship with the client at the centre.  My way of being integrative is more about integrating the heart, mind and body in the work that I try to do.  However, I do  bring in my interests and passions in the ever-changing area of personal growth and human development, and by being open to these new emerging conversations of the world.

My experience also tells me that many of the benefits of counselling are in gaining self-compassion, so that we can forgive ourselves for being human, with both human animal and human spirit interacting together to create our uniqueness.

I can offer help with:

  • Anxiety, including hyperarousal and fearfulness
  • Depression, including hopelessness, despair and inertia
  • Low self-esteem and self-confidence
  • Forms of abuse, including domestic violence, sexual abuse, physical and psychological abuse
  • Stress, including work-related
  • Trauma, including specific traumatic events or long-term chronic trauma
  • Self-harm
  • Grief and loss, including bereavement
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Relationships, within families and within partnership, including divorce or separation, affairs and betrayals
  • Stages and transitions through life phases for both women and men
  • Health or medical anxiety, including living with chronic illnesses or past illness, or of those you love
  • Carer stress
  • Addictions, including drugs, alcohol, eating disorders
  • Highly sensitive people
  • ADHD
  • Phobias and OCD